Keeping it Real: Dealing with Psoriatic Arthritis by Eating Gluten Free

 

I will tell you what, being over weight is hard on your body by itself—but compounded with Psoriatic Arthritis; well it just means you hurt a lot. I am sure there are a lot of people who are in my boat. There are medicines that I take every day, but even that doesn’t always curb the pain. I do have steroids that I can take, but I really do try not to take those if possible. I have kept a food diary and I have found out that when I eat breads and pasta—I flare. A flare for me lasts days. Days of joint pain. Days of migraines. Days of my Psoriasis turning red, scaly, super itchy, and blisters form on my skin and burst. It’s not fun. Once I saw a pattern, I decided to test my theory. I ate gluten, and the next four days were awful. Pain, swelling, itchy, and limited in what I was able to do around the house. I know that this may not work for everyone, and I am no doctor, but what I do know is what worked for me. I try to be as gluten free as I can be. I have to cook at home more, and when I go out I stay away from gluten (which isn’t all that easy—but it can be done).

a3eae8fdf9d5728d8f28abf8aebb3f94

A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oat, and all their species and hybrids (such as spelt, kamut, and triticale). Gluten causes health problems for those with gluten-related disorders, including celiac disease (CD), non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In addition, a gluten-free diet may improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or HIV enteropathy, among others. Gluten-free diets have also been promoted as an alternative treatment of people with autism.
(Sources: Wikipedia, Mayo Clinic)

Gluten-Free-Diet-infographic

 

This is not an easy change. But it is one that has help me tremendously. I also try to keep my son, who has autism, on the same diet as me. He seems to stem less when he eats less gluten. Most, if not all, of my recipes are all gluten free. That’s how I cook. There are things that you can find at HEB, Walmart, or even Sam’s that are gluten free. My kids love the gluten free snacks—from pretzels to blue diamond crackers. You just have to make a choice that this is something you are going to commit to. I did, and truly it is amazing how much better I feel.
If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to comment.

glutenfoods
©copyright 4/17/18
Written by Amy Shaw-Chilson

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s